CB Adams

CB Adams Stacks Up at Framations Memory: Joy & Loss Exhibit

Random Access by CB Adams at Framations Gallery's Memory: Joy & Loss Exhibit

Random Access by CB Adams at Framations Gallery's Memory: Joy & Loss Exhibit

A black and white photograph by CB Adams titled Random Access was awarded an Honorable Mention by juror Lynn Friedman Hamilton during the opening of the juried art exhibition, Memory: Joy & Loss, at Framations Art Gallery, 218 North Main St., St. Charles, MO. Friedman, former director of the Brentwood Gallery in St. Louis, selected the photograph for this exhibition featuring artworks inspired by memory and its function in people's lives.

Random Access was one of three entries submitted by Adams, who is principal of Qwerky Studio. "Because art is so subjective, I never know which pieces will be accepted into a themed show and whether any will be given special recognition. When I dropped off my entries, the one that I thought was thematically strongest (a grid with four variations of a toy camera image of a mural dedicated to the memory of slain teenager Michael Brown), wasn't chosen for the show. I was surprised -- pleasantly surprised -- that Random Access was recognized by Ms. Friedman with an Honorable Mention," Adams said.

Random Access depicts a stack of fictitious movie scripts with their titles handwritten on the bottom edge. Adams photographed the stack during a recent trip to Los Angeles. Adams had forgotten about the photograph until he was scrolling through his digital library that presently contains more than 20,000 images, both digital and film-based.

"When I was making my selections for submission, Random Access was not in my initial pool of candidates. I was in a bit of a hurry when this image stopped me cold. I didn't take this photograph with this show in mind, but it does perfectly capture the random, mysterious nature of recalling memories," Adams said.

Random Access and Adams's other photograph in the exhibition, I Can't Remember, is a sepia-tinged black and white image. Such toning is not part of his usual photograph printing process, but a podcast by Brooks Jensen, a photographer, author and publisher of LensWork magazine, opened him to other possibilities.

"I usually prefer a straightforward, contrasty black-and-white image, but I was influenced by something I heard in a Jensen podcast about serving the intent of a photograph using any means or enhancement available to a photographer. I just feel the images are enhanced with that bit of sepia tone," Adams said.

I   Can't Remember  by CB Adams

I Can't Remember by CB Adams

Memory: Joy & Loss will be showing from Dec. 8, 2017 to Jan. 18, 2018. Visitors may vote for a Best in Show throughout the exhibition. Random Access and I Don't Remember have overall dimensions of 20 x 24 inches and are available for sale through the gallery.

Adams is a St. Louis-based professional writer, short story author, and fine art photographer. He has exhibited in numerous St. Louis-area gallery exhibitions at The Foundry Art Centre, Art St. Louis, and St. Louis Artists' Guild, among others, as well as nationally in Boston, Sacramento, New York and Salt Lake City. At Framations, Adams received a Second Place and Honorable Mention award in Beyond the Lens VIII at in 2014.

Juror Lynn Friedman Hamilton has extensive experience in the art world in St. Louis. In 6 years as director of Brentwood Gallery, she curated more than 70 shows that traveled regionally and internationally. Long a champion of older artists, she spent more than 25 years organizing social group activities for older artists and adults, before forming the not-for-profit organization Maturity and Its Muse.

A black and white photograph by CB Adams titled Random Access was awarded an Honorable Mention by juror Lynn Friedman Hamilton during the opening of the juried art exhibition, Memory: Joy & Loss, at Framations Art Gallery, 218 North Main St., St. Charles, MO. Friedman, former director of the Brentwood Gallery in St. Louis, selected the photograph for this exhibition featuring artworks inspired by memory and its function in people's lives.

Random Access was one of three entries submitted by Adams, who is principal of Qwerky Studio. "Because art is so subjective, I never know which pieces will be accepted into a themed show and whether any will be given special recognition. When I dropped off my entries, the one that I thought was thematically strongest (a grid with four variations of a toy camera image of a mural dedicated to the memory of slain teenager Michael Brown), wasn't chosen for the show. I was surprised -- pleasantly surprised -- that Random Access was recognized by Ms. Friedman with an Honorable Mention," Adams said.

Random Access depicts a stack of fictitious movie scripts with their titles handwritten on the bottom edge. Adams photographed the stack during a recent trip to Los Angeles. Adams had forgotten about the photograph until he was scrolling through his digital library that presently contains more than 20,000 images, both digital and film-based.

"When I was making my selections for submission, Random Access was not in my initial pool of candidates. I was in a bit of a hurry when this image stopped me cold. I didn't take this photograph with this show in mind, but it does perfectly capture the random, mysterious nature of recalling memories," Adams said.

Random Access and Adams's other photograph in the exhibition, I Can't Remember, is a sepia-tinged black and white image. Such toning is not part of his usual photograph printing process, but a podcast by Brooks Jensen, a photographer, author and publisher of LensWork magazine, opened him to other possibilities.

"I usually prefer a straightforward, contrasty black-and-white image, but I was influenced by something I heard in a Jensen podcast about serving the intent of a photograph using any means or enhancement available to a photographer. I just feel the images are enhanced with that bit of sepia tone," Adams said.

Memory: Joy & Loss will be showing from Dec. 8, 2017 to Jan. 18, 2018. Visitors may vote for a Best in Show throughout the exhibition. Random Access and I Don't Remember have overall dimensions of 20 x 24 inches and are available for sale through the gallery.

Adams is a St. Louis-based professional writer, short story author, and fine art photographer. He has exhibited in numerous St. Louis-area gallery exhibitions at The Foundry Art Centre, Art St. Louis, and St. Louis Artists' Guild, among others, as well as nationally in Boston, Sacramento, New York and Salt Lake City. At Framations, Adams received a Second Place and Honorable Mention award in Beyond the Lens VIII at in 2014.

Juror Lynn Friedman Hamilton has extensive experience in the art world in St. Louis. In 6 years as director of Brentwood Gallery, she curated more than 70 shows that traveled regionally and internationally. Long a champion of older artists, she spent more than 25 years organizing social group activities for older artists and adults, before forming the not-for-profit organization Maturity and Its Muse.

Thoughtful Dog Publishes “Cock’d,” A New Short Story by CB Adams

Thoughtful Dog, an online literary and lifestyle magazine, has published my latest short story, “Cock’d,” in its April 29th issue. This is the first of what I hope will be the renaissance of my fiction-writing career after a more than 15-year hiatus. “Cock’d” opens with a reference to Rod Stewart, but it is Steve Winwood who wrote the theme song for this moment:  I'll be back in the high life again/ All the doors I closed one time will open up again/ I'll be back in the high life again/ All the eyes that watched me once will smile and take me in.

I’m not sure that publishing a short story constitutes the “high life,” but then again, for those of us who write serious short fiction and work to find a home for it, this is as good as it gets. Writing is hard and slow. I accept that challenge. My relationship with the process of attempting to get that work published is like Fatal Attraction. I start off submitting with naïve, hopeful anticipation and as the rejections pile up, I realize I’m involved with Alex who keeps telling me, “You are a cock-sucking son of a bitch. I hate you. I bet you don't even like real girls, do you? Ha! You disappoint me, you fucking faggot!”

Some days, I’m not up to this challenge. Still, I write on.

“Cock’d” represents the process at its easiest. It received only 14 rejections before Thoughtful Dog Editor-in-Chief Loie Sayers accepted it for publication. Because I am a Missouri-based writer, I typically submit my work first to appropriate Missouri literary journals as a show of support to this state’s literary efforts. They passed on “Cock’d,” but Thoughtful Dog, which features literary fiction as well as interviews, essays, and articles on the art of writing and the literary life, got it. Thoughtful Dog is earnest about publishing good writing and literature without taking themselves too seriously, and “Cock’d” certainly fits into that aesthetic.

So, the story is written. The story is published. Now it needs readers. It’s online, so it is easy to find and read. Follow the links, then follow me if you want. I’ve got one story making the rounds with more than 50 rejections and more work in the hopper. Stay tuned. Keep reading.

 

 

CB Adams Work in Food, Glorious Food Exhibition at Art Saint Louis

Tea Tree by CB Adams

As a photographic artist, I seek out only those exhibitions that really interest me and those that I hope are open to my style of work. One of the highlights for me is the upcoming Food, Glorious Food at Art Saint Louis. Friends and family became tired of me constantly saying, “I really hope I get into Food Glorious Food.” To make matters worse, I did not receive notification that one of my two entries, “Tea Tree” had been accepted for almost a week because the email was blocked by my spam filter. Still, I’m in and I’m thrilled.

Art Saint Louis brings art and food together for a block party celebrating the exhibition Food, Glorious Food in the gallery/café at 1223 Pine Street in downtown St. Louis. The opening is more than just an opening – it’s an event. Please join me on Saturday, July 26 for all the best in local food and art.

 Jurors for Food, Glorious Food are Allyson Mace, Publisher and Founder, Sauce Magazine, and avid photographer and art supporter; and Sara Choler Hale, artist and founder of Fair Shares CCSA.  Food, Glorious Food returns to a popular theme introduced two years ago in Art Saint Louis' 2012 exhibition series. The art takes inspiration from all aspects of food, from farm to fine dining. The exhibition features 76 creative treats by 51 local artists and includes paintings, woven pieces, ceramics, assemblages, fiber sculpture, drawings, printmaking, photography, and much more. All pieces are available for purchase, and none is priced more than $400. “Tea Tree” is priced at $120!

The main course, of course, is the art exhibition – but there’s much more on the menu! Food trucks will offer delectables outside the gallery and the baristas of Mississippi Mud Coffee Roasters Café will create hot and cold drinks made to order inside. The adjacent Kauffman Park will house live painters, chalk artists, live music and more – plus plenty of room for picnickers.

Food trucks rolling in for the opening event on July 26 include Bombay Food Junkies, The Sweet Divine and Zia’s. There will also be live artmaking by artists Michael Anderson, Lon Brauer, Jennifer Hayes and Erin McGrath Rieke, and chalk art created by Chelsea Soronen and Rusty Conklin of Chalk Riot. Guests are welcome to contribute their own chalk art designs with chalk provided by event sponsor Artmart.

The exhibition is on display at Art Saint Louis July 26 through September 11, 2014. Gallery is free & open to the public Monday 7 a.m.-4 p.m., Tuesday 7 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturday 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Closed Sundays & holidays, including Labor Day holiday & weekend, August 30 & September 1.